Media and Marketing in the Modern Age

As the digital era continues to evolve, print media has adapted to our modern lifestyle - there’s no doubt. History has proven the resiliency of new technology, and we’re currently walking a tightrope between print and digital media.

Over the LAST decade, our appetite for content has skyrocketed thanks to blogging and social media, which will only continue to grow.

Today, we’re taking a moment to contemplate their roles for the wedding industry and how creatives can take advantage of these new opportunities for long-term marketing success.

There have been a few remarkable shifts for many mainstream media; like Martha Stewart Weddings, a brand who will continue primarily as a digital platform, with a single print issue annually. In the Fall, XO Group, whose flagship brand is The Knot, merged with WeddingWire. These changes, among others, reveal widespread executive-level changes happening at outlets around the country. From the perspective of a media liaison, our team can attest to changes felt by our editorial friends and the priorities they’ve been tasked with from a content standpoint.

A recent AdAge article spotlights Troy Young, who previously led Hearst’s digital operations but now oversees both digital and print for a collection of the Hearst name brands. "Mediums don't die, but their use cases shift as new mediums put pressure on them…” says Young. “The nature of magazines change when a consumer gets their news in the moment from their phone. It makes you think differently about the role of the magazine. It still plays an important role, but it's different." Read more here - it’s fantastic

Rather than focusing on the consolidation or ‘shrinkage’ that may be happening with print, consider how you may be able to effectively diversify your efforts in a way that generates new business.

Traditional ‘media relations’ is still effective, but even more so with a blended approach to social media, content development and creative marketing campaigns working in tandem. Here’s an example: we don’t send static press releases (and never will). Why not? It’s tired, lackluster and mechanical. Instead, we opt for creative visual graphics along with proactive pitch angles that are tailor-made for an editor’s precise audience. It’s just one of the ways we have reinvented traditional practices to serve our clients. So, how will you do it for yourself?

Embrace emerging outlets

Consider newer or niche outlets like podcasts and blogs to showcase your work and expertise. Read and listen to them often, and gain a sense of trust in their content. While they may have smaller following than a widely distributed magazine, their audience are invested and engaged. Brand awareness will be a goal you’ll share with the editor, so maximize the impact of your feature with a mutually beneficial social campaign to increase reach across your shared networks.

Meet your audience where they are

Revisit the characteristics of your ideal client (and if you need help, we designed a helpful blog post a while back). Where are they spending their time? What are they reading or listening to? Perhaps it’s an independent quarterly design journal or a podcast on sustainable living. Could you creatively find a way to collaborate with those outlets? Or maybe, it’s just Instagram to start. Make sure that you’re engaging with the brands your clients follow, and bring value to those conversations. Seek opportunities to share curated content that resonates with your ideal client. These simple ‘hacks’ can make a significant impact.

Need more help? Our marketing consulting service is perfect for giving your brand a boost.